Diabetes: Is your A1C AOK?

What IS the A1C?
The A1C actually reflects the patient’s average blood sugar over the last 2-3 months.  It measures the percentage of a patient’s red blood cell is coated with sugar, or “glycated”.  The higher the A1C, the poorer the patient’s blood sugar control, and the higher the risk of diabetes complications.
Who should have this test, and how often?
If a patient is younger than 45 and has risk factors such as obesity, high blood pressure, high cholesterol, a family history of diabetes, or other risk factors, they should have their A1C checked.
Patients who are 45 or older and are obese should have their A1C checked.

If a patient is at risk of diabetes, or has had high blood sugars, they should have their A1C checked once a year.

 

Patients with Type 2 Diabetes who don’t use insulin  should have their A1C checked twice a year.

Patients with Type 2 Diabetes who use insulin should have their A1C checked twice a year.

Patients with Type 1 Diabetes should have their A1C checked four times a year.

Some patients may need A1C tests more often if their diabetes treatment is being changed.

If a patient is having an A1C test, they do NOT have to fast before the test.

What is normal?  A normal A1C is below 5.7 percent.  If it is between 5.7 to 6.4, the patient may have pre-diabetes.

A1C that is 6.5 or greater shows that the patient has diabetes.

A1C

 

 

 

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